Fullscreen
Loading...
 
Print

Unemployment of Educated People

The emir of Qatar came in person with a pledge of $1.25 billion. ...

The show of support, as the Tunisian government threw open its doors this week at a two-day investment conference, was a measure of the stake the entire region feels in keeping Tunisia’s democratic transition on track.

It was also an acknowledgment that the greatest threat to that transition may be Tunisia’s weak economy, which is sowing discontent, especially among young people in rural areas. ...
The Tunisian economy has been in decline since 2011, and the government is struggling with a growing budget deficit. Investors fled the post-revolution disarray and have been further scared off by terrorism since 2013.
Mr. Chahed was plucked from relative obscurity to be prime minister by President Essebsi in the summer, after the predecessor, Habib Essid, lost a vote of confidence. Mr. Chahed represents a new generation of Tunisian politicians that had no part in government before the revolution. ...
He says his focus will be on creating jobs, especially for the youths in the disadvantaged regions in the interior of the country. This week, he will embark on a tour of the country to start a $250 million microcredit program for young entrepreneurs.
“One of the biggest problems in Tunisia is that one in three unemployed is educated, around 33 percent of unemployed people has a higher degree,” he said. “This is one of the biggest challenges. We need to create growth, inclusive growth, equally distributed between the coast and inner area of the country.” ...
- Carlotta Gall, Tunisia Seeks Foreign Investment to Cement Democratic Gains, NYT, Nov. 30, 2016


“On the one hand, there is a huge gap between what the universities are teaching and what the economy needs: Study courses in Tunisia are much too theoretical and the students don’t have enough practical experience. On the other hand, many graduates are hard to place because they don’t know how to write a job application or how to present themselves in a job interview.” This is how Youssef Fennira describes the reasons for the high unemployment among academics in Tunisia. ...
Dr Martin Henkelmann, the managing director of the AHK, confirms this view: “Tunisian academics are highly qualified and have a profound theoretical knowledge. But they lack a direct connection to practical work, to the everyday routines of a company.” Apart from expert qualifications, there is a demand for IT-skills, knowledge of how to give a presentation and, above all, social competence, also known as “soft skills”. “Team spirit, flexibility, a sense of responsibility and organisation are important key words in the everyday work-life of a company”, Dr Henkelmann points out. ...
But there is still a lot of work to do in order to achieve a real change in the job market for academics in Tunisia. “On the one hand, vocational training has to be strengthened in Tunisia”, says Dr Martin Henkelmann. “On the other hand, university courses must become more geared towards the demands of the employing industries: More internships of more than three months’ duration should become mandatory.” And, of course, a stay abroad for study or internship can greatly improve the work prospects of academics in Tunisia – including new language skills and cultural impressions.
- Verena Striebinger, Equipped for the job market – unemployed academics in Tunisia, Alumniportal Deutschland


Show php error messages