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Inequality in Edwardian England

Of course, hunger among England's poor - or the world's poor, for that matter - was nothing new. But the London press and the emerging sociological studies informed Britain's victims of their victimization. One such survey disclosed that in the bleakest neighbourhoods of the capital, the richest city in the world, one infant in four died because mothers were incapable of producing milk. Another study, in Leeds, showed that half the children of the destitute were marked by rickets, and 60 per cent had bad teeth. Workmen learned that 1 percent of the country's population controlled 67 per cent of the nation's capital, while 87 per cent of the people were left with 8 per cent of the wealth. The average labourer earned one pound a week. ...
Wealthy Edwardians, like the peeress quoted by Vita Sackville-West, were untroubled by all this. It was the will of God....
- William Manchester, The Last Lion: Winston Spencer Churchill: Visions of Glory, p. 304


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