Fullscreen
Loading...
 
Print

Diversity

But a massive new study, based on detailed interviews of nearly 30,000 people across America, has concluded just the opposite. Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam — famous for "Bowling Alone," his 2000 book on declining civic engagement — has found that the greater the diversity in a community, the fewer people vote and the less they volunteer, the less they give to charity and work on community projects. In the most diverse communities, neighbors trust one another about half as much as they do in the most homogenous settings. The study, the largest ever on civic engagement in America, found that virtually all measures of civic health are lower in more diverse settings.
- Michael Jonas, The downside of diversity, Boston Globe, August 5, 2007


In 2014, Facebook updated its site to include nonbinary gender identities and pronouns, adding more than 50 options for users who don’t identify as male or female, including agender, gender-questioning and intersex. ...
The internet is a place where nonbinary people can learn about mixing masculine and feminine elements to the point of obscuring concrete identification as either. As one person she interviewed put it, “Every day someone can’t tell what I am is a good day.” ...
To scroll through the images is to understand that there is no one way to be nonbinary. The entire point underscores the idea that there is no status quo, no “normal” and no need to limit yourself based on a societal ideal. ... Another person posting under the handle AfroAutPunk shows themselves wearing a Prince shirt, headphones and lipstick, with the caption, “Black, fat, disabled, nonbinary, queer and intersex.” ...
Vaid-Menon is extremely active on Instagram, uploading daily stories and posts for their 146,000 followers. Scrolling through their page reveals an inspired bouquet of multicolored and multipatterned outfits, lips coated in blues, pinks or purples. They are constantly playing around with their presentation, seamlessly blending together suits, thigh-high boots, dresses, sweaters, hair colors, makeup, footwear and accessories to create a look that truly feels beyond any known understanding of masculine or feminine — which is exactly the point. ...
To the average scroller, the photos themselves give the impression of a celebratory postgender, postracial world. But reading the accompanying text more often than not reveals a life marked by anxiety, trauma and fear. ...
“The majority of nonbinary, gender-nonconforming cannot manifest themselves because to do so would mean violence, death, harassment and punishment,” Vaid-Menon told me. ...
“There is a gender-sex distinction that has been normalized even in progressive movements,” Vaid-Menon begins. “There’s an idea that gender is a cultural attribute, expressed by fashion and outfits, whereas the body has to do with sex. There’s a series of binaries that are created here.” Vaid-Menon warms up as the talk continues, speaking in a cadence that is accelerating and tinged with anger. “Why is it that when trans people take hormones, it’s seen as body modification, and if cis people take hormones for, like, a medical condition, it’s not seen as body modification? That’s where transphobia lives. The body is mutable. Sex is mutable. Sex is not a ‘biological essential category.’ We allow gender to be nonconforming while we stabilize sex.”
- JENNA WORTHAM, ON INSTAGRAM, SEEING BETWEEN THE (GENDER) LINES, NYT, 2018/11/16


Show php error messages