Fullscreen
Loading...
 
Print

Beauty

Beauty, she says, is seen as a step toward success in work and in society. ...
Still, wealth is concentrated in the hands of a small elite, and the average Chinese consumer has only a fraction of the money to spend as the average American does. Hundreds of millions of people still live in rural areas with few prospects for jobs. Competition to get into universities is fierce, and competition for good jobs after college can be fiercer.

For women, the field can be even tougher. China’s anti-discrimination laws are rarely enforced. Help-wanted ads often specify whether the employer is looking for a man or a woman, and those looking for females often set height or appearance requirements. ...
That’s far from the days of the Cultural Revolution, when makeup was seen as a trapping of bourgeois vanity. ...
In China, people under 35 are the main customers for cosmetic surgery, while 80 percent of people getting plastic surgery in the United States are over 35, according to a report on the industry by HSBC. It cited, as one motivator, the prevalence of smartphone apps that expose people to beauty marketing and encourage them to scrutinize their photos. ...
“Many women always feel like they have flaws,” said Ms. Liu, 23, a graduate film student who uses Meitu to narrow her face, shrink her nose and remove dark circles from under her eyes. “They all wish that through some kind of method they can make themselves more beautiful. Meitu is the cheapest and most convenient way to do this.” ...
Beauty, said Mr. Ngan, is “somewhat synonymous with happiness, in a way, because you generally feel more happy when you’re more beautiful.”
- Amie Tsang and Emily Feng, China’s Meitu, an Aspirational Beauty App, Goes Public, NYT, Dec. 14, 2016



Show php error messages